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Term 1  Writing as Practice  16/17

Weekly Schedule

Week 1 – Introduction to option and brief. ‘Pleased to meet you…’ First writing exercise

Week 2 – Workshop/Seminar 1. ‘The Extraordinary Everyday’ Second writing exercise

Week 3 – Workshop/Seminar 2. ‘In Triplicate’ Third writing exercise

Week 4 – Workshop/Seminar 3. ‘Re-Writing Re-Views’ Fourth writing exercise

Week 5 – Independent Learning Week – ‘In Parenthesis’ Fifth writing exercise

Week 6 – Workshop/Seminar 4. ‘Disassemblaging’ First editing exercise

Week 7 – Workshop/Seminar 5. ‘Cut up and glue again’ Second editing exercise

Week 8- Workshop/Seminar 6. ‘Pasting and Finishing’ Third editing exercise

Week 9 – Tutorials.

Week 10 – Submission on Turnitin by 4pm

Bibliography

 Key texts

Acker, K. (1985) ‘Realism for the Cause of Future Revolution. From Art After Modernism, Rethinking Representation’ in Bodies of Work. 1997. Serpent’s Tail. London.

http://docslide.us/documents/acker-realism-for-the-cause-of-future-revolution.html

Goldsmith, K. (2011) Uncreative Writing: Redefining Language and Authorship in the Digital Age. Columbia University Press.

http://www.veramaurinapress.org/pdfs/Kenneth-Goldsmith_uncreative-writing.pdf

Kraus, C. (2004) ‘Emotional Technologies’ in Video Green. 2004. USA: Semiotexte.

Commentaries on this text can be found at: http://www.metamute.org/sites/www.metamute.org/files/You-Must-Make-Your-Death-Public-Chris-Kraus-9781906496647.pdf

Indicative reading

Barthes, R. (1967) Death of the Author. Aspen

http://www.tbook.constantvzw.org/wp-content/death_authorbarthes.pdf

Foucault, M. (1983). This is not a pipe. Berkeley: University of California Press https://monoskop.org/images/9/99/Foucault_Michel_This_Is_Not_a_Pipe.pdf

Francis, P. (2011) Inspiring Writing in Art and Design: Taking a Line for a Write. Intellect, London

‘Inspiring Writing in Art and Design is an excellent resource for all those who wish to engage art, design and media students in the practice of writing […] I would highly recommend Dr. Francis’s generous and inspiring book. ‘ – Jac Cattaneo, Networks Magazine, ADM-HEA

 Fusco, M. (ed). 2011. Who is this who is coming? Inscription as Method in Contemporary Art Writing. London: Article Press

http://mariafusco.net/editing/who-who-coming-inscription-method-contemporary-art/

Gallop, J. (2002) Anecdotal Theory. USA: Duke University Press.

‘”Anecdote” and “theory” have diametrically opposed connotations: humorous versus serious, specific versus general, trivial versus overarching, short versus grand. Anecdotal Theory cuts through these oppositions to produce theory with a sense of humour, theorizing which honours the uncanny detail of lived experience. Challenging academic business as usual, renowned literary scholar Jane Gallop argues that all theory is bound up with stories and urges theorists to pay attention to the “trivial,” quotidian narratives that theory all too often represses.’

 Lomax, Y. (2000) Writing the Image: An Adventure with Art and Theory. London. I.B. Taurus.

“It has a twofold purpose and function: it can be read and enjoyed as performance, often resembling poetry, thick with ideas, images and metaphors. It is also an original contribution to theoretical writing on the visual, particularly relating to the image and difference, celebrating and referring to the work of Michel Serres, Gilles Deleuze, Luce Irigaray and others in pursuit of its own strategy of introducing the written image into the theoretical text.”

 Madden, M. (2006) 99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style. London. Jonathan Cape

http://mattmadden.com/comics/99x/

Perec. G. (2008) Species of Spaces and Other Pieces. London. Penguin Classics

https://monoskop.org/File:Perec_Georges_Species_of_Spaces_and_Other_Pieces.pdf

Queneau, R. (2013) Exercises in Style. Alma Classics

http://www.almaclassics.com/excerpts/Exercises-in-Style-Excerpt.pdf


Learning Outcomes

 On completion of this Option you will be able to:

Express your opinions as a result of informed, structured research from a variety of sources (Research)

 Engage in constructive and informed critical argument and debate (Analysis)

Identify the key issues, themes and critical debates surrounding the subject of design and cultures (Subject Knowledge)

 Construct an argument and demonstrate an awareness of a range of communication techniques, research methods and writing skills (Communication and Presentation)

 Evidence engagement with the principles of personal and professional development (Personal and Professional Development)

 Learning and Teaching

This element of the Option is delivered through a series of workshops, presentations and visits where we will examine key debates, developments and issues in relation to the branding choices thinking. The sessions will draw upon your individual experiences and perspectives in order to develop a nuanced and in-depth understanding of this area of research.

Assessment Requirements

A portfolio of writing that connects the chosen Option with practice, theory and research, including the documentation of process, handed in as a PDF file via Moodle using Turnitin. Deadline: Term 1 (Element 1) Tuesday 6th December (6.12.2016) by 16.00 GMT (4.00pm)

(This will be summatively assessed and will make up 40% of your grade for CTS in year 2).

Term 2 (Element 2) Tuesday 14th March (14.03.2017) by 16.00 GMT (4.00pm)

(This will be summatively assessed and will make up 40% of your grade for CTS in year 2).

Assessment brief

Using the ideas, theories and concepts introduced this term, answer the question:

 Your portfolio of writing submission should consist of:

1) 5 edited blog posts of 300-500 words, which can include, exhibition reviews, case studies, research notes, etc.) that connect your chosen Option with practice, theory and research, including the documentation of the process.

2) A longer text of 1500-2500 words related to your Option.

Both these elements should be presented in a single, digital PDF file of less than 20mb. You should think about the design and layout of this piece of work, and integrate images with captions (40% weighting of Option mark).

Description of the course 

As the author of Stylish Academic Writing (2012) Professor Helen Sword argues, ‘“Snakes on a Plane” is an inviting title; “Aggressive Serpentine Behaviour in a Restrictive Aviation Environment” is not.’ (theconversation.com 2012)

This option will be an exploration into the many exciting and exquisite worlds of critical stylish academic writing.  It will take you on a journey through a multitude of Hows and Whys where you will end being a more confident and nuanced writer and art and design and your own work.

This option focuses on writing as art or creative practice. Building on the methods and ideas established in the Year One writing workshops, this option introduces students to a variety of writing practices and objects, with a particular focus on style, defined here as the relationship between form (language, sentence structure, grammar and so on as well as distribution, layout and typography) and content. While we will cover more traditional modes of critical writing, this option shifts ideas of writing about the arts to writing as art and focuses on unconventional practical reading and writing exercises, which will be developed over the course of the term.

The option aims to encourage students to think about writing in the same way as their other creative practices; as a divergent, malleable and contingent practice, which affects and is affected by its subject, especially when this subject is also a creative practice (writing ‘about’ art as art writing). The option presents historical and theoretical arguments around the validity of different kinds of knowledge production, including personal narrative and anecdote, appropriation, détournement, bricolage, material critique, fan fic, collective writing and exegesis, while introducing students to radical texts around art, design, reading and writing practices.

We will work particularly with the LCC library’s excellent zine collection in thinking about complex relations to a politics of writing, art, design, fashion, music and distribution. 

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Timetable 14/15

Week 1 – Introductions

(Who are You? Who are We?)

Linda Stupart & Mark Ingham

Intro to blog

Intro into course

Intro into politics of zines

Intro into DIY

Zine Exercise 

Week 2 – What is What? (Georges Perec)

(The Extraordinary Everyday)

Mark Ingham

Writing exercises about how the small details can be as important as the bigger picture.

“To question the habitual. But that’s just it, we’re habituated to it. We don’t question it, it doesn’t question us, it doesn’t seem to pose a problem, we live it without thinking, as if it carried within it neither question nor answers, as if it weren’t the bearer of any information. This is not longer even conditioning, it’s anaesthesia. We sleep through our lives in a dreamless sleep. But where is our life? Where is our body? Where is our space?”

(Perec, G. (1973) Species of Spaces and Other Pieces. Penguin, pp. 205-7)

Week 3 – “Dead Doll Humility”

(What does style mean)

Linda Stupart

Kathy  Acker: Read the Kathy Acker Text Dead Doll Humility

What does this tell us about plagiarism and copyright?

Acker’s other examples of ‘plagiarism’

What does this tell us about rewriting ?

What does this tell us about language as material?

What does this tell us about style as a relationship between form and content?

(What does style mean)

Reading text out loud

200 word summary 

Week 4 – Re-Writing Re-Views

(Cataloging your ideas)

Mark Ingham

The personal impersonal personal

You are to write a review of an LCC exhibition of between 200 and 500 words, which you have to put up on your blog in a publishable form by Monday 03 November. It must include images and can include moving images and links to other resources.

Week 5 – Context

Writing Brief for final 1500 word text introduced and worked on and gone through thoroughly

(Signs of the Invisible)

Linda Stupart & Mark Ingham

Read through/look at Jenny Holzer’s Truisms. Look also at Barbara Kruger

Think about

a) advertising/text and image  

b) site specific text

Read Julian Stallabras’ Advertising the Invisible

 c) Think about the situationists (and everyday) and think about graffiti

Homework: site specific text: insert a text into public space  – this can take the form of posters, stickers, pamphlets etc. – think about relationship to text and site.

Week 6 – Caravaggio on My Mind

(Agitation)

Linda Stupart

Rethinking Relationship between object of study/writer:

Barthes Camera Lucida/Mythologies

Chris Kraus Emotional Technologies

Kathy Acker Caravaggio

bell hooks  Art on My Mind

Rewrite your review in two voices:

a)    the ‘personal’ – why did you specifically respond the way you did, what is your particular relationship to this work/show?

b)   The ‘political’ – what might this work/show mean in regards to broader political questions? Either contemporary questions (where is the gallery? Who sees the work? What does this mean) or ones around the work itself ? How can this work reflect and/or comment on and/or challenge broader political concerns?

Week 7 – “In Triplicate”

(Writing in the Round)

Mark Ingham

Writing Brief for final 1500 word text introduced and worked on and gone through thoroughly

Week 8 – Calligram

(in language) echoes the form (in space/conceptually)

Linda Stupart

Read Michel Foucault’s This is Not a Pipe

Consider relationship/non-division between form and content (style)

Write Calligram

Homework: Write ‘about’ your object/image/artwork etc. in a way that formally (in language) echoes the form (in space/conceptually) of the object itself. 

Week 9 – Concluding Remarks

(Summations)

Linda Stupart & Mark Ingham

Conclusions

Week 10

1:1 Tutorials

Hand in Texts Friday 20th March 2015 by 4pm via Turnitin on Moodle

“Re-Writing Re-Design”

Key Words: Writing, Stylish, Design, Articulation, Audiences
Description of the course:As the author of Stylish Academic Writing (2012) Professor Helen Sword argues, ‘“Snakes on a Plane” is an inviting title; “Aggressive Serpentine Behaviour in a Restrictive Aviation Environment” is not.’ (theconversation.com 2012)Re-Writing Re-Design’ will be an exploration into the many exciting and exquisite worlds of critical stylish academic writing.  It will take you on a journey through a multitude of Hows and Whys where you will end being a more confident and nuanced writer and art and design and your own work.Modes of teachingAction WorkshopsActive SeminarsArticulated lectures 

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CTS 2 option Writing Design

Essay Brief

Writing Design Three Ways’

One copy of the 2,500 word essay to be submitted by electronic submission via Moodle by 8.30 pm on 14th March 2014

In the next week you are to choose one piece of designed cultural production from the twentieth century to the present day. This can take any form as long as it has or had a designed purpose within culture or cultures.

It could be a book, a poem, a piece of writing, a dance, a pop song, a painting, a sculpture, and installation, an event, a poster, a film, play, typography, wallpaper, a ballet, industrial design, graphic design, an advert, a building, amongst other types of cultural production. It can be ‘high’ art/design or  ‘popular’ art/design. As long as it has had some sort of effect or affect on the world we live in.

On Tuesday 28th January in your 4-6 session you will give a 1 minute presentation on your chosen piece of designed cultural production. All you will have to do is describe WHAT it is it and WHY you have chosen it. This will be through your blog.

Your essay will be in 5 parts, an introduction, a conclusion and 3 main sections.

Each of the 3 main sections will describe, analyse and situate your chosen piece of cultural production in 3 distinct, separate and different ways. You will take 3 different views, angles, positions, writing styles, of it. You could look at it through 3 different theoretical ‘lenses’ from your own area of practice.  You could do a semiotic analysis of it. You could psychoanalyse it. How would Sigmund Freud see it? How would a forensic scientist look at it? How would an artist look at it?  Would people of different ages, cultures, genders look at it differently? You could use 3 different genres of fiction writing to describe, analyse and situate it.  How would you describe it in a sci-fi way? If it was written like a gothic novel what would it read like?

Whatever 3 ways you choose, they must try and say something about your piece of cultural production that has not been said before. This will mean you have to research a variety of ‘methods’ of analysis. You may use one of the methods discussed in your Research Methods course.

You will include an annotated bibliography of no less than 6 books and 12 online sources. All references MUST be cited correctly in the text according to the UAL Harvard Referencing system, which can be found at: http://bit.ly/1fVFdZa

Learning outcomes:  On completion of this unit you will be able to:

• Express your opinions as a result of informed, structured research. (Research)

• Engage in constructive and informed critical argument and debate. (Analysis)

• Place your practice in a broader visual context. (Subject Knowledge)

• Employ appropriate means of communication in the presentation of concepts    and ideas. (Communication and Presentation)

Mark Ingham

January 2014

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